NASCAR driver will debut a Trump 2020 car in Brickyard 400 race against Bubba Wallace

A NASCAR driver will debut a Trump 2020 car in the Brickyard 400 race against Bubba Wallace this weekend, just weeks after the black driver found a ‘noose’ in his garage. 

Corey LaJoie, 28, will take to the tracks this Sunday in his newly painted Ford Mustang which will have ‘Trump 2020’ splashed across the hood and rear-quarter panels, his race team announced Wednesday. 

Go Fas Racing revealed the new design for the number 32 car ahead of the race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Indianapolis, this weekend and pledged its support for Donald Trump‘s reelection campaign. 

A NASCAR driver will take to the tracks this Sunday in his newly painted Ford Mustang which will have ‘Trump 2020’ splashed across the hood and rear-quarter panels (pictured), his race team announced Wednesday

‘I am honored to be part of the President’s re-election campaign through the Patriots of America PAC,’ team owner Archie St. Hilaire said in a statement.

‘As a Trump 2020 supporter, this team will do everything possible to secure victory on and off the track electing President Donald Trump to a second term.’  

LaJoie said he hoped the design would spur more racing fans to vote in the upcoming election. 

‘With an estimated 75 million NASCAR fans out there, I was surprised that about 15 million of those fans are not registered voters,’ he said Wednesday.

‘I will give my best effort to get NASCAR fans registered to vote, through our team efforts on and off the track. When they see the car, hopefully, it makes them race to the polls in November.’

The blue, red and white design also features ‘Your Vote Counts’ and was created in partnership with the pro-Trump Patriots of America PAC.  

The overt show of support for Trump on LaJoie’s car at the upcoming event comes after Wallace debuted a Black Lives Matter paint design on his car at Martinsville Speedway in Virginia in early June. He is driving a different blue design this weekend.

Bubba Wallace (pictured) found a 'noose' in his garage at another race event in June

Corey LaJoie, 28, (pictured) will debut the Trump 2020 car in the Brickyard 400 race against Bubba Wallace this weekend

Corey LaJoie, 28, (right) will debut the Trump 2020 car in the Brickyard 400 race against Bubba Wallace (left) this weekend, just weeks after the black driver found a ‘noose’ in his garage at another event

Go Fas Racing revealed the new design for LaJoie's number 32 car ahead of the race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. This comes after Wallace, 26, debuted a Black Lives Matter paint design on his car at Martinsville Speedway in Virginia in early June (pictured)

Go Fas Racing revealed the new design for LaJoie’s number 32 car ahead of the race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. This comes after Wallace, 26, debuted a Black Lives Matter paint design on his car at Martinsville Speedway in Virginia in early June (pictured)

Wallace, the only black NASCAR driver, found himself at the victim of a suspected hate crime when a ‘noose’ was found in his garage stall at Talladega Speedway on June 21.

Wallace, 26, had only two weeks earlier led calls for the Confederate flag to be banned from NASCAR venues and races.  

NASCAR agreed to ban the flag and both the company and Wallace faced a major backlash from their southern fans.

One driver on NASCAR’s truck series, Ray Ciccarelli, vowed to retire at season’s end over the move. 

Meanwhile a group called the Sons of Confederate Veterans staged a protest, with a small propeller plane flying the Confederate Flag over the race track and a caravan of cars parading it in front of the main entrance before the scheduled race. 

The discovery of the noose-like rope sparked fears Wallace was the target of a racist attack.  

All 39 other NASCAR drivers rallied in support of Wallace at the race’s restart the following day, collectively pushing his No. 43 car to the front of the grid in a show of solidarity. 

Wallace, the only black NASCAR driver, found himself at the center of a suspected hate crime when a 'noose' was found in his garage stall at Talladega Speedway on June 21. All 39 other NASCAR drivers rallied in support of Wallace before Monday's restart (pictured) following the discovery of the noose, collectively pushing his No. 43 car to the front of the grid in a show of solidarity

Wallace, the only black NASCAR driver, found himself at the center of a suspected hate crime when a ‘noose’ was found in his garage stall at Talladega Speedway on June 21. All 39 other NASCAR drivers rallied in support of Wallace before Monday’s restart (pictured) following the discovery of the noose, collectively pushing his No. 43 car to the front of the grid in a show of solidarity

NASCAR released a photo of the suspected 'noose' found in Wallace's garage stall which was investigated by the FBI as a possible hate crime before being revealed to be a garage door pull rope that had been in use for at least a year

NASCAR released a photo of the suspected ‘noose’ found in Wallace’s garage stall which was investigated by the FBI as a possible hate crime before being revealed to be a garage door pull rope that had been in use for at least a year

Wallace, an Alabama native, became overwhelmed with emotion and fought back tears as his car owner, NASCAR legend Richard Petty, gave him a hug in the moments before the race began. 

NASCAR and the FBI both launched investigations into the ‘noose’, which revealed the rope was in fact a garage door pull-down rope that was previously used in the same stall by a white driver, Paul Menard, in 2019. 

Footage from earlier years showed similar garage door pulls being used by other drivers, although none appeared to look exactly like a ‘noose’ in the same way the rope in Wallace’s stall did.

Wallace had only two weeks before the 'noose' incident led calls for the Confederate flag to be banned from NASCAR venues and races. Some southern fans were outraged and flew the Confederate Flag over the northern Alabama race track before the scheduled race and a caravan of cars paraded the rebel banner in front of Talladega's main entrance (pictured)

Wallace had only two weeks before the ‘noose’ incident led calls for the Confederate flag to be banned from NASCAR venues and races. Some southern fans were outraged and flew the Confederate Flag over the northern Alabama race track before the scheduled race and a caravan of cars paraded the rebel banner in front of Talladega’s main entrance (pictured)

According to US Attorney Jay Town and FBI Special Agent Johnnie Sharp Jr., nobody could have known that Wallace would be assigned that specific stall prior to the June 21 race.  

Circuit officials questioned representatives from every NASCAR track to learn exactly how many garage door pull-down ropes were tied in a similar manner. 

Of the 1,684 stalls across 29 tracks, only 11 had knotted pull-down ropes, and just one of those had been fashioned into a noose – the one in Wallace’s stall – according to NASCAR.com.  

Some people have slammed the investigation over the rope a ‘hoax’ and said NASCAR had somehow overreacted over the shocking incident.

Wallace hit back at the accusations saying the whole experience was ‘just short of pure hell’ for him and that the ‘common denominator is racism’. 

Brickyard 400, the annual 400-mile NASCAR Cup Series points race, will take place on Sunday at 1 p.m. local Indiana time. 

THE ‘NOOSE’ TIMELINE

  • June 9 – Bubba Wallace, NASCAR’s only black full-time driver on its top circuit, calls on the sport to permanently ban the Confederate flag
  • June 10 – NASCAR bans the flag at all races after 70 years
  • June 21 – Ahead of the scheduled start of the GEICO 500 in Alabama, a Confederate flag is flown over the Talladega track while a caravan of protestors drive rebel banners back and forth in front of the entrance
  • June 21 – After the race is postponed by rain, someone from Wallace’s team discovers the suspected noose in his garage stall
  • June 21 – NASCAR confirms the discovery of the ‘noose’ 
  • June 22 – The FBI launches an investigation into the suspected hate crime
  • June 22 – All 39 other NASCAR drivers rally in support of Wallace ahead of the GEICO 500 restart, pushing his No. 43 car to the front of the grid in a show of solidarity
  • June 23 – The FBI reveals that the suspected ‘noose’ is a garage door pull-down rope that had been in use for at least a year
  • June 24 – Wallace praises the FBI for its investigation and says he is ‘relieved’ that he was not the target of a racist gesture
  • June 25 – NASCAR releases a picture of the door pull, showing a long length of rope fashioned into a loop with one end coiled around the knot
  • June 25 – NASCAR reveals that of the 1,684 garage stalls across its 29 tracks, only 11 had knotted pull-down ropes, and just one of those had been fashioned into a noose – the one in Wallace’s stall 

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